What’s Happening more

  • The art of selling in public relations

      By Low Sieu Ping, Senior Account Executive, The Hoffman Agency Singapore Public relations (PR) is very much about reputation management. Most PR consultants can associate themselves with building and/or shaping opinion for a win-win scenario between their clients and the clients’ stakeholders. But in this course of seeking that attention and receiving favourable sentiments is an essential hidden art of selling that is often overlooked and not articulated. Unlike advertising agencies, PR agencies promote companies or individuals via earned media (i.e., editorial coverage on newspapers, magazines, TV programmes), as compared to paid media (i.e., advertisements). Whether these companies or individuals eventually come across as “powerful” is founded on the exchange of ideas and opinions between the PR person and the journalist. (If you can assume that the PR consultant is like your average fishmonger, then this is where the neighbourhood granny comes along with five reasons not to buy your freshest fish.) Typically, PR agencies construct their business around writing strategies, positioning their bread and butter as the pen and paper, drafting and scripting content that includes advertorials, media releases and statements. But, try bringing that down one notch. If you were to strip the role of the PR consultant to its most basic function, we are the ones whose job it is to offer a creative, engaging and relevant (yes, to currency and timeliness) pitch of our client’s products and/or services. In other words, the PR consultant is a salesperson. Selling an intent Like our peers in the advertising industry, we share that same goal of making our clients appear successful, exciting and relevant. But that itself requires a delicate balance of push and pull. A broadly skilled PR consultant will serve as the communication strategist in the middle of each party, dishing out solid advice while also charting a creative direction for storytelling. Harmonizing the intricate three-way relationship (journalist, PR agency, client) is a remarkable trait of a good PR person. It all boils down to a PR consultant’s expertise being the ability to articulate thoughts (promoting the product) to the journalist (buyer), and then bringing in the revenue to the client (cashier). Media relations is close to naught if PR consultants do not think with a sales hat on. Is that all? Probably not. Convinced that PR drives positive outcomes, clients appoint agencies to take charge of their reputation, and leave it to the agencies to (fortunately or unfortunately) manage their bosses. Be it with the CEO or CFO, clients demand that PR be quantified in an appealing manner to make business sense. It has become a norm for PR professionals to navigate the C-suite level to present a clear perspective on what PR is all about, and why it absolutely deserves a place in their agenda alongside operations, marketing and finance. Talk about selling the elusive and qualitative value of PR right here! As we now move into the digital age, the PR industry is experiencing a shift in function and identity. For PR agencies to survive in this cut-throat industry, many have gone down the route of creating a communications difference with digital media, including social media. Which begs the question, what exactly are we selling? A product? Nah. An idea? Not really. An intent. Bingo. To meet demands, PR agencies have jumped on the bandwagon in providing capabilities to create a difference with their customers via digital media. As PR consultants edge their way up the marketing spectrum and have the C-suite view PR as a powerful and motivating force for long-term revenue and brand awareness, an established ability in the digital space will greatly help increase the channels for the industry

    read more ...

Chicken Rice for the Soul more

  • Playing the Long Game in China


    (Post originally appeared on Ishmael’s Corner) When we entered the China market in 1999, I shared with our staff that our long-term success in Asia depended on China. I no longer believe this. Instead, it’s clear to me that our long-term success on the international front depends on China. When we experienced turmoil in our […]

    The post Playing the Long Game in China appeared first on Chicken Rice for the Soul.

  • Playing the Long Game in China

    (Post originally appeared on Ishmael’s Corner) When we entered the China market in 1999, I shared with our staff that our long-term success in Asia depended on China. I no longer believe this. Instead, it’s clear to me that our long-term success on the international front depends on China. When we experienced turmoil in our […] The post Playing the Long Game in China appeared first on Chicken Rice for the Soul.

    read more ...

Ishmael’s Corner more

  • Microsite Makes a Case for “Storytelling Techniques” in Business Communications

    The Art Of Storytelling In Business Communications And Public Relations. Techniques For Effective Business Communications. Since conducting our first storytelling workshop in 2011, the honing of the material has been a never-ending process. To this point, we’ve considered the methodology as our intellectual property. It was part of how we differentiated the Agency, an approach to developing content that recognized that given a choice between dull or interesting, human beings will gravitate ...more The post Microsite Makes a Case for “Storytelling Techniques” in Business Communications appeared first on Ishmael's Corner ~ Storytelling Techniques For Business Communications.

    read more ...

Slideshare more

The emphasis on visuals combined with words makes for crisp storytelling


Infographics

In a content mad world, visuals can cut through the clutter
infographics